Post your breakfast, lunch or dinner

harryopal1

Active Member
Jul 20, 2023
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Hi Harryopal. Fact finding mission mixed with a holiday. Just relaxing now until Monday as the journey was a bit exhausting.
been out for a walk this morning. I see zebra crossings are just for decoration
So in which part of Bali are you relaxing?
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Dori

Member
Jun 28, 2023
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Sorry Balifrog. Won’t go off on a tangent again.
we are enjoying the food we’ve had so far in Bali. ill try to upload the photos and keep on your good side
 
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Balifrog

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Dec 30, 2017
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Sorry Balifrog. Won’t go off on a tangent again.
we are enjoying the food we’ve had so far in Bali. ill try to upload the photos and keep on your good side
But a thread with a trip report would be most welcome as well I am sure !
 

Foamcrest

Active Member
Jun 11, 2016
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I’m sorry Dori, nice try but Balifrog has set the bar far too high on the food scale for a not so well cooked banana pancake, a bit of fruit and a cup of dishwater to rate. He‘s French you know and so when they are not rioting in the streets about something mundane they are mastering the art of eating. It’s very complex and takes a lifetime to even come close to mastering. Even Markit bows his head to the master, although I must admit his crack at cabbage rolls rated highly in my book. Me, I’m toast and Vegemite with the possibility of a smoothie.
I look forward to your travel thread.
 
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Markit

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Sep 3, 2007
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If you're tempted to a street satay, bear in mind that is not unknown for street dogs to finish up as satay.

Trust me, you'd know the difference. It's not a saving option, many of the locals like dog and some actually measure medicinal benefits to eating it. On top of that it's been outlawed here for the past 2 or 3 years so only on very special occasions.
 
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Foamcrest

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Jun 11, 2016
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The egg has to be easy over for me, it just looks too raw otherwise. Just my preference of course, 300 million Indonesians, and one Frenchman can’t be wrong.
 
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Balifrog

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Dec 30, 2017
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The egg has to be easy over for me, it just looks too raw otherwise. Just my preference of course, 300 million Indonesians, and one Frenchman can’t be wrong.
Asians usely cook fried eggs and omelette to a point where it taste like carton .....

When I eat soft eggs in the jungle village, the family look at me like I am a canibal eating raw eggs..
 

Balifrog

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Dec 30, 2017
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Easy lunch yesterday. Butter, Ham and Emmental sandwich.

Easy doesn't mean cheap... just by curiosity I calculated the C.O.G. (Cost of Goods) and arrived at a total of 85K. And that is before adding my very expensive expat labor expertise cost !

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Balifrog

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Dec 30, 2017
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For dinner we went for more serious stuff ! Pork blanquette with Basmati rice. It is supposed to be veal blanquette, but good luck finding veal here.
BTW : If somebody has an address for veal, I am all ears.

The full recipe is here :


This guy is French but speaks perfect English and his cooking is typical French food like at home.

Mise en place :

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Note the "Bouquet Garni", an assembly of vegetables and herb to aromatize the sauce.

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Mise en place for the Basmati rice :

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Proces for the rice : 2 or 3 spoons of olive oil in the pan, brown slightly the rice for a few minutes, add all the spices, cover with boiling water and let simmer till the rice is cooked. Don't forget to "mix" every 5 minutes....
Achtung : The rice is supposed to stay "al dente", not become the mushy white stuff they often serve in local restaurants !


Final result :

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Plated (and yes, I forgot to wipe the plate clean...)

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Can't give myself a good note for this :
1) I forgot the mustard (OK, added when serving)
2) not enough white wine
3) I tried to add bacon instead of pancetta, and it did impact on the taste of the sauce. Normally I pass on the pancetta / bacon.

Well, it can't always be a 10/10 .......

Timewise, well we start the mise en place a 03:30 pm in order to have everything ready between 05:30 and 6:00 pm.....

Today the remaining Basmati rice will be used to make fried rice for lunch. Taste is completely different than with regular rice.
 
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Markit

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Sep 3, 2007
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Normally basmati rice is first washed several times then cooked (closed lid) for 10 minutes. stirring once, then allowed to sit and soak up the rest of the water. NEVER stir or open the lid before it's finished.

It's Indian, you know NOT French.

If I took 2 hours to organize what I was cooking before starting I'd be completely shit faced first.
 
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Balifrog

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Dec 30, 2017
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Normally basmati rice is first washed several times then cooked (closed lid) for 10 minutes. stirring once, then allowed to sit and soak up the rest of the water. NEVER stir or open the lid before it's finished.

It's Indian, you know NOT French.

If I took 2 hours to organize what I was cooking before starting I'd be completely shit faced first.
You do it your way.....

The way I do it is more like you would do for a paella.

Of course it's washed first, like any rice.
Then it is fried with the spices, before adding water.

The reason you regulary stir it is to make sure the spices / seasonning are properly mixed with the rice.
 
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Markit

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Sep 3, 2007
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Karangasem, Bali
You do it your way.....

The way I do it is more like you would do for a paella.

Of course it's washed first, like any rice.
Then it is fried with the spices, before adding water.

The reason you regulary stir it is to make sure the spices / seasonning are properly mixed with the rice.
Not to be too pedantic and a bit overkill but you are French and never believe anything anyone says - but you never stir the rice, never! Proof:

Paella​

Instructions

  • *Please note, this is my version of Paella Mixta I learned to make while living in Madrid, Spain. I've simplified the recipe as best I could for anyone to be able to make without a special pan or equipment. There are MANY variations to Paella so please be respectful that my authentic recipe may be different from yours!
  • Add olive oil to a skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, bell peppers and garlic and cook until onion is translucent. Add chopped tomato, bay leaf, paprika, saffron salt and pepper. Stir and cook for 5 minutes. Add white wine and cook for 10 minutes. Taste and add salt if needed.
  • Add chicken pieces, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley and rice to the pot. Cook for 1 minute.
  • Pour the broth slowly all around the pan and jiggle the pan to get the rice into an even layer. (Do not stir the mixture going forward!).
  • Bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low. Give the pan a gentle shake back and forth just once or twice during cooking. (We don't ever stir the rice, so that a crispy crust forms at the bottom, called a socarrat).
  • Cook for about 15-18 minutes (uncovered), then nestle the shrimp, mussels and calamari into the mixture, sprinkle peas on top and continue to cook (without stirring) for about 5 more minutes. Watch for most of the liquid to be absorbed and the rice at the top nearly tender. (If for some reason your rice is still not cooked, add ¼ cup more water or broth and continue cooking).
  • Remove pan from heat and cover pan with a lid or tinfoil. Place a kitchen towel over the lid and allow to rest for 10 minutes.
 
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