Self Isolation or Full Quarantine?

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mugwump

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2011
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seattle pekutatan
I'm not writing "lessons in semantics" here, whatever they might be.
I'm already sharing my "observations".
I hail from scientific and academic backgrounds and try be as unbiased as I can.
I'm also a retired psychologist and musician (player, sound/recording engineer, soundtrack composer), telescope maker.
Covers a lot of ground, not just one particular "discipline".

Any special "observations" you'd like?
:)
Wow!
 

harryopal

Well-Known Member
May 5, 2016
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Given that there is a substantial Balinese population from Java and other parts the notion of some Balinese genetic resistance to Covid-19 would hardly cover those from elsewhere. So the low infection rate is more likely to be from lack of identification or other factors
 
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Markit

Well-Known Member
Sep 3, 2007
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Karangasem, Bali
Yes and no. Sickle cell anemia is a genetically transmitted blood disorder, (not a virus). It passes between generations though human reproduction, where at least one or both parents got it from theirs. Some parents can be carriers without symptoms, but still have it and can pass it on (not by breathing or coughing).
Malaria is caused by a parasite (not a virus). You can't get malaria by breathing in a mosquito.
And I've yet to spot a mozzie that can somehow cough up it's blood-carrying parasite into a human's.
You misunderstood my comparison, maybe this will clear it up:
People develop sickle-cell disease, a condition in which the red blood cells are abnormally shaped, if they inherit two faulty copies of the gene for the oxygen-carrying protein haemoglobin. The faulty gene persists because even carrying one copy of it confers some resistance to malaria.

Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/articl...cell-carriers-fend-off-malaria/#ixzz6HVeOhtFd
 
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JohnnyCool

Well-Known Member
Jan 10, 2009
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Sanur
You misunderstood my comparison, maybe this will clear it up:
People develop sickle-cell disease, a condition in which the red blood cells are abnormally shaped, if they inherit two faulty copies of the gene for the oxygen-carrying protein haemoglobin. The faulty gene persists because even carrying one copy of it confers some resistance to malaria.

Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/articl...cell-carriers-fend-off-malaria/#ixzz6HVeOhtFd
I love New Scientist and good that you're reading it too.
Hadn't yet read that particular article, just skimmed through it briefly now. The "Paradox" section's illuminating.

Of course, I'm as confused as ever (like many others).
Should we encourage more sickle cell disease and/or breathe more carbon monoxide?
Smokers probably have enough CO in their systems already, not forgetting how much of that gas is breathed in every day through traffic/air pollution.
Stay safe.