PLEASE ADVISE RE: SOSIAL BUDAYA

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Carol

New Member
Sep 2, 2003
8
0
1
Maui, Hawaii
Greetings

Even though I’m new to this forum I have a strong connection with Bali, which has continued since my first trip there in 1990. I managed to return three more times since then, spending nearly month each time. I love it there.

I would like to come back to Bali, perhaps early next year, this time for an extended stay. I’m currently working on obtaining a Sosial Budaya. I’m sure many other people are too, given the pending changes in the visa rules. Personally, I don’t think a visa charge is any big deal but the time limitation seems counter productive for Bali’s economy. Giving visitors and part time residents plenty of time to spend money there seems prudent from my point of view.

My question to this forum pertains to the reasons most likely to convince immigration to grant me a social/cultural visa. I am now retired and I would like to come to Bali for six months or a year. My intention is to do some kind of volunteer work either tutoring English, or be involved in the health care of expectant mothers and their babies. I’m very interested in learning about birthing and childcare practices in Bali. I’m really open to most anything that would contribute the community in and around Ubud.

This brings me to the point of this query. Even though I’m pretty sure I have found a sponsor, I’m getting the impression that volunteer work is not something that meets the criteria for a social/cultural visa. It seems the government doesn’t see the value in volunteer work in that they see it as ‘work’ and not a direct contribution of money into the economy. If one is studying Bahasa, dance or art, I suppose money has a more direct flow by way of payment to the providers. Otherwise the visitor’s money is only going to accommodations, food, transport etc. I guess infusing the economy in other ways is the desire of the Indonesian government. Understandable I guess.

So, can anyone advise me as to the best ‘story’ or reasons for needing to be there which might facilitate the granting of a visa? I would greatly appreciate any suggestions for the best way to deal with the application. Thanks to any of you who are willing to take the time to answer.

One other question. Only one? Yeah right. I’m retired and live on a fixed income and have obligations I will have to cover at home. Am I dreaming or is it possible for me to manage there on US$1000 per month? I certainly hope so.

The barriers may be numerous but not insurmountable. I’m hopeful.

Thanks again,

Carol
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Social/Cultural Visa

Carol, it sounds like you are “stressing” a bit about this visa. Your visa is called a “social/cultural” visa, and it’s no big deal. Once you have a sponsor, and ideally that sponsor should be on the island, or the region you plan to spend most of your time, viz, Bali, the only thing you should indicate is “cultural study of dance, music and art.” That is it, or as Bert would say, “that’s all.”

Your own plans to work as a volunteer…keep to yourself. Just do it once you’re here, and don’t worry about it. For that matter, given my own work with pre-natal care in my own village, if you need a sponsor, my Balinese wife will be more than happy to help you and be your sponsor.

A thousand US a month should suffice you fine, but including housing, you won’t live exactly like a princess…but you’ll feel like one!

I applaud your intentions. Bali has a number of fine expats like you, but there is certainly a need for more. When you arrive, be sure to contact me. I’d be delighted to introduce you at an Ubud Rotary meeting, and to all the fine folks who make up the Ubud expat community.

PS…I’m assuming you already know that the social budaya visa is in fact, only a two month visa? It is renewable in Bali for four months after the expiration of the initial two months, but for a fee. I can help you with this…it’s actually very easy. Departing Bali is only required if you fail to renew the visa. This is done monthly, and it’s always advisable to use an agent.
 
(does anyone ever read this subject line?)

Carol is right that volunteer social work is not allowed with a social visa, hence Roy's advise to keep quiet about that. The social visa is quite clear that you are not allowed to work for money or for free.

You can work for barter though. A favor given, for a favor received. Do not run around telling people that you are a "social worker", though. No organized prenatal care center.

As a friend you can advise your friend on prenatal care though.

Ken
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Ken’s point is right on. The ultimate word is “discreet.” Sad it is that this insanity is “operandi de jour” but it is, and nothing you, me, or a bastion of expats can do anything about it. The key is not to try to change the impossible, rather, to work within it. Many here do, and do it very well. Selamat Carol! Your ideas and intentions are most honorable. Pre natal health care is very close to my heart…and so is education. So…you go girl! :!:
 

Carol

New Member
Sep 2, 2003
8
0
1
Maui, Hawaii
Thanks so much for the advice

Thanks for the help in learning the Bali 'drills'. Needless to say, I anticipate a long learning curve. Hopefully, I'll get by with a little help from my friends.

I'm still on target for arriving in April and I'm so looking forward to it. It's been interesting reading the recent posts. I know life in Bali is full of challenges, I have good intentions, hopefully I have good sense.

I appreciate any feedback.

Regards, Carol