Of expatriots, tourists and forums.

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Bang_Bob

New Member
May 9, 2005
2
0
1
Indonesia
Hello everyone I'm a newbie here.

I find the topic that Py brought up (apparently a couple of years ago) fascinating. I'm not a bali expat but I am Indonesian and I am an expat, just not in Indonesia. I'm always fascinated by what other people around the world think about our country and that is the main reason why I like to follow forums such as this one.

I've only been to Bali a few times and most of my knowledge about the Island, believe it or not, has been acquired from bali expats than from a Balinese. I don't know it that's good or bad. I do have a question for you guys. What do you think of Indonesian locals, such as me, jumping into the discussion where obviously they are looking things from different perspective and don't necessarily experience the same problems that expats & foreign tourists are experiencing in Bali? I'm interested to hear pros & cons. No holds barred. I can take it.
 

drdana

New Member
Jul 28, 2005
26
0
1
san francisco bali
dear bob, I for one would find it refreshing and welcome. i hope you write openly.

but then who am i to say? THey are probably throwing me in jail for a long time for having written a complaint against a rat ridden losemen.

so i guess i will not be able to visit my house, at all.
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Jimbo, not exactly a “warm and fuzzy” welcome there for Bob, eh?

Bob, yes, for sure your input from your unique points of view will be more than welcomed, so please, post away! This forum’s success is based on a variety of input from various people, almost always presented without hidden agendas.

So yes, go for it, and share your perspectives with us. I say, welcome!
 

mungo

Member
Sep 17, 2006
38
0
6
fremantle
Thanks Py and other contributors. I am new to the forum and your comments seem to be down to earth. I am not an ex-pat, but it is one of my ambitions to live and breathe in Bali. I now realise life in Bali for ex-pats is not all beer & skittles, but it seems also that it a peacefulness and less complications than a western life.

At the moment I live in another land that offers high taxes, taxes on almost everything, un-real property prices, ever increasing road traffic, unreliable public transport systems, a plethora of hidden traffic speed cameras and speed signs, questionable gov't laws, high council rates, gov't , police and corporate corruption, huge waiting lists for the treatment of chronic and acute medical conditions, sky rocketing food & petrol prices & gov't charges, increasing insurance, electricity, gas and water charges, convicted murderers violating parole & roaming the streets, a huge nationwide drug problem, a constant barrage of doom & gloom tv and radio news dominated by what the gov't is doing (or not doing) and the fact that weather here at the moment is cold and windy. Apart from all that everything is honky dory. See what you ex-pats are missing out on?

Yes for us pinkys who visit the great island, no matter how many times, it still takes a good week (or two) to get into Bali mode and accept the quietness and peacefulness of Bali life even after grovelling for a year or two in the above. By that time it is often time to head back to some more grovelling. Most of us tourists shop, eat, swim, talk and walk. Usually once the suitcase is full we relax, but only for a day. I accept the busy roads of Bali and find the people a lot more courteous and aware than they are back where I come from. I accept the slowness of service, because at least in Bali I get some. I accept when in Bali, you do as the Balinese do. The only problem for a lot of us, bombs or no bombs, is Bali is always a hard place to leave. Surviving and living, to me, are more important than surviving and stagnating. Becoming an ex-pat seems to be an attractive option to someone wanting to change their lifestyle. I appreciate anyone who takes the time to have their say, as a lot out there don't have an opinion, which to me is sad. Cheers and beers.
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Welcome to the forum Mungo. I can’t say I particularly enjoyed reading your litany of life as you know it in Fremantle, (so depressing), but I can say that life is all about choices.

You make your bed, and then you sleep on it. Next time you throw your sheets into the washing machine, you can think on that. Good luck to you.
 

mungo

Member
Sep 17, 2006
38
0
6
fremantle
Gee whiz Roy, thanks for the welcome, but I don't know what galaxy you dwell in or exactly get your drift but I didn't think I was whinging and didn't mean to depress you or anyone else who I may have thought were logical people with a reasonable IQ. I re-read my post and convinced myself that it must be the way you read into things Roy.

If humour is something unavailable in Bali, then I must reconsider moving there. I would hate to think that I would become a cretin. I was relaying things as they are, as I have experienced them, lived and survived them. Some ex-pats may have forgotten what it is like. Mind you Roy, I made my bed long ago and contributed to the "system" with no regrets. Always had an opinion and paid heavily to the tax system....you know one of the little things that I think drive lot of ex patriots away from the rat race.

Thanks for the two cent lecture and I will seek your wisdom in the future on matters which may depress others before I put them to type. It must be nice to sit on the fence and look down at the plebs like me who enjoy life.
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Mungo, don't worry yourself too much on what planet, or part of the universe I reside. It ain't Pluto, as the experts have recently denounced our beloved and faithful side kick of Mickey Mouse as a planet. :evil:

Mungo, you did write:

At the moment I live in another land that offers high taxes, taxes on almost everything, un-real property prices, ever increasing road traffic, unreliable public transport systems, a plethora of hidden traffic speed cameras and speed signs, questionable gov't laws, high council rates, gov't , police and corporate corruption, huge waiting lists for the treatment of chronic and acute medical conditions, sky rocketing food & petrol prices & gov't charges, increasing insurance, electricity, gas and water charges, convicted murderers violating parole & roaming the streets, a huge nationwide drug problem, a constant barrage of doom & gloom tv and radio news dominated by what the gov't is doing (or not doing) and the fact that weather here at the moment is cold and windy.

I don't know about other readers, but to me, that sounds like a litany of woes....and without humor.

You say,

Some ex-pats may have forgotten what it is like.

You are bloody right about that. We wouldn't be here if we wanted to remember, or live, that past. :p

Once again, welcome to the forum, and if you can manage to keep your speedos on, you just might learn a thing or two here. :p

Harry Truman: "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen."
 

mungo

Member
Sep 17, 2006
38
0
6
fremantle
Like your quick response Roy, given the fact that there seems to be a large gap in posts on the forum in regard to the subject heading. Looking forward to further (positive) posts and I am here to learn and if I can also contribute in a positive way I shall do so. Perthaps your computer may need fixing or you have an IT problem. On that note I will leave you with this (perhaps you may have heard it before ):

javascript:emoticon(':lol:')
LaughingThe Bathtub Test

We are all usually fairly well aware of our physical health, but often forget to assess the state of our mental health. This short test may help you:

During a visit to the mental asylum, a visitor asked the Director what the criterion was which defined whether or not a patient should be institutionalized.


"Well," said the Director, "We fill up a bathtub, then we offer a teaspoon, a teacup and a bucket to the patient and ask him or her to empty the bathtub."


"Oh, I understand," said the visitor. "A normal person would use the bucket because it's bigger than the spoon or the teacup."


"No." said the Director, "A normal person would pull the plug. Do you want a bed near the window?"

DID YOU PASS, OR DO YOU WANT THE BED NEXT TO MINE?
 

Roy

Active Member
Nov 5, 2002
4,835
1
36
Ubud, Bali
Perthaps your computer may need fixing or you have an IT problem.

Nope, my “puter” is running just fine. As for gaps on this forum, may I bring to your attention that it was YOU who decided to revisit this string which was started by my friend Py on Mon Dec 09, 2002!

That's bloody near four years ago!

Like I said Mungo, keep those speedos on! :p :p :p
 

Jen

Member
Apr 17, 2004
56
0
6
Sydney
Hi Mungo

Good luck with your dream mate!

As Roy always says: Many are called but few are chosen.

I would highly recommend you stay for long periods of time in Bali before you decide to relocate. All is not what it appears! Hmmmmm.

Anyway, you are so negative about my magnificent country, better you go and make way for the 1000's who are literally dying to get in!

Oooroo
 

mungo

Member
Sep 17, 2006
38
0
6
fremantle
No problem Jen. I didn't think you comprehended my post that well, but then again you are from Sydney so I understand. The poor wanna be Aussies will all be working for low pay and hardly no conditions whilst people like you continue to keep your head in the sand and say f..k you Jack, I'm okay. There are more sheep in Australia besides the ones grazing in paddocks.
 

Someone

New Member
Jul 20, 2006
10
0
1
Kuta
Re: RE: Of expatriots, tourists and forums.

mungo said:
At the moment I live in another land that offers high taxes, taxes on almost everything, un-real property prices, ever increasing road traffic, unreliable public transport systems, a plethora of hidden traffic speed cameras and speed signs, questionable gov't laws, high council rates, gov't , police and corporate corruption, huge waiting lists for the treatment of chronic and acute medical conditions, sky rocketing food & petrol prices & gov't charges, increasing insurance, electricity, gas and water charges, convicted murderers violating parole & roaming the streets, a huge nationwide drug problem, a constant barrage of doom & gloom tv and radio news dominated by what the gov't is doing (or not doing) and the fact that weather here at the moment is cold and windy.

I'm from Canada, and spent about 10 years in the States. I loved both countries, especially for the various vast natural beauties. I've been in SE Asia for 5 years now, and have found the change agreeable. In the States I had problems with anxiety and depression, and had a driven personality, as if always in fight or flight mode. My attitude has changed now, and I live less for the future. I love to complain about some of the more negative cultural and social aspects of life here, but the positive of the more laid back lifestyle is a huge, life enhancing plus. And for a middle aged single western man, a wider range of ages of partners is more available for dating, or even marriage.
 

mungo

Member
Sep 17, 2006
38
0
6
fremantle
Hi Someone and I must apologise if the realities of life must be exposed to this forum, although I take your post as part of an experience in your life and an observation. Our countries share many similarities that are good and not so good.

I am sure some Aussie ex-pats living in Bali would be a little re-assured that some of the "nasty" things of Australia still linger. I have a few friends that live and work in Bali, so we all share the same sentiments.
I worked within a large workforce for many years and was involved with unions. It is when you are battling to maintain your Rights and conditions that you see what gov'ts will do to control its taxpayers and workers, and what money will do to good men.

Those
1000's dying to get in
(to Australia) as our hit 'n run forumite :evil: has un-wittingly put it, will take our jobs for a lot less money and have no conditions and thus further degrade the living standards which took a long time, a lot of lives and a few wars to achieve. I would hope anyone coming to Australia got the same conditions and lifestyle as those who have come here from other countries over the past two centuries, who have contributed their cultures and skills and also enjoyed the fruits of their efforts.

When I put such realities on "paper" I suppose one with a weak stomach could become quite depressed just reading them. The one thing we drones cannot simulate on paper is expressing text into mood. When one posts to a forum, one is in danger of drawing criticism. Many people avoid critisism and the realities of life, as they have either never experienced them or it gives them such stress just to think about it, that they just curl up, or disappear or sadly, just stay silent. Some just read the parts of a post that irk them, either they don't or can't comprehend the post, then they either mis-read or mis-interpret what is written and finally they get themselves tied up into a little knot, type out some odd angry words, take a Panadol or 2, and then disappear for a week or so.

The point to which I was alluding in my post was that Bali is a breath of fresh air for those unfortunate not to be able to leave the rat race for more than a few weeks of the year. Living on the great island, even though it isn't probably perfect, to me is a long time lingering thought, even perhaps a dream. The Balinese people, their culture and religion deserve some of my dollars and it is they who are a big part of the Bali experience for my wife and myself. I hope my children will be able to share the Bali experience when they get older, because it is their future that concerns me, as well as that of the Balinese.

It is good to hear that your life has changed for the better, as I can personally relate to your earlier mention of your once held disposition. I have visited many places on the planet, but after visiting Bali for the past 26 years, it has become like an old close friend and one that helps me find some inner peace.
 

nessie

New Member
Apr 12, 2007
21
0
1
Perth WA Australia
Wow !!
I am a Newbie on this particular forum as well..

You know we all have choices and that includes where we decide to habitate, maybe Indonesia, New Zealand , Australia or whereever.

JUst a short message here after reading all these post,

Do you Not want new people to join this forum, very serious, Look if you don't like living whereever you may be then Damn well make a life change and MOVE.

Nessie

"How people treat you is their Karma: How you react is yours"
 

Tinkerbelle

Member
Jan 20, 2007
80
0
6
Perth Western Australia
Wow, theres another forum ha ha? It just shows how people view life so differently in a country. When I arrive back in Australia after a visit to Bali I feel the roads are huge and desserted. Where I live it is quiet and I can go to the shops to browse not be hassled. I would rather have a hospital wait here with the best hospital treatment than be rushed anyday into a hospital in Bali. Or as you have a choice in Australia pay for private medical insurance and don"t wait!. I also think where you live is different if you have children. I myself want an Australian standard education for my kids with the opportunity to go to university like myself . Again I put my kids before myself in giving the best for them. I think people forget Bali is a 3rd world country??. I have pondered the thought of retiring to Bali in the future but as many know on this forum I have definately changed that view. Maybe the day we stop receiving boat loads of refugees from Indonesia and Indonesia has boat loads of Aussies heading there I may rethink it ha ha. I think maybe you have missed the best opportunities we have here in Perth Mungo and think you may find living in Bali hard if you think its hard here. But as we all have choices I wish you well. Again I still love Bali for that dream fantasy Island getaway twice a year and love the people.
 

nessie

New Member
Apr 12, 2007
21
0
1
Perth WA Australia
Tinkerbell,

I am with you..... Mungo lives in Freo, how "lucky " is he ??

Has Cappucino strip and exitement al year round.
Bali is beautiful, I go there a few times a year, cheap holiday for us from Perth and I am on;ly 3 hours away from home.

To reside there permanently , No, maybe if I had a multi millionaire in tow , so I could zip in and out when I wanted to, may put things in a different perspective.. But I have to qork hard and save for my holidays.
You know each to their own, I go to Bali and look at some of my friends lifestyles, yes appears ideal and it is for them, then I talk to some that are disgruntled with the lifestyle for all the reasons that I read from Py in a previous post.. BUT you know what, if you are not happy being a "Guest" in anothers' country , well then damn well move.
Lived in Thailand for a while in the 80's, then hubby was working there, maid and helpers were fantastic to start with , after a while I missed my cultural lifestyle that I was accustomed to, but I never moaned or groaned and soaked up every experience that I could, and always remembered that I was a Guest in their country and culture.
The old saying goes " If you can't handle the heat in the kitchen , well get out"
Well its ANZAC day here in OZ and NZ and a Public holiday, so I will enjoy that as well.

Nessie