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Learning Bahasa Bali

Discussion in 'Marriage, Kids and Schools' started by gilbert de jong, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. gilbert de jong

    gilbert de jong Active Member

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    Hi everybody,

    I was wondering if anyone knows where one can learn Bahasa Bali (yang halus)? I'd prefer one-one teaching but if I'd have to go back to some school-form of teaching (class-room) is also ok. I know it's a longshot, but realy want to learn it, so if anyone has some sugestions, they are very welcome. So please no ' talk to your neighboor' or something like that, hahaha.
    I already tried that, but somehow it doesn't work that well.
    Thanks for any help in advance....friendly greetings, Gilbert.
     
  2. Markit

    Markit Well-Known Member

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    Get a Balinese girl friend! Always the best and most enjoyable way to learn a language - not, necessarily the cheapest though :lol:
     
  3. spicyayam

    spicyayam Well-Known Member

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    I found a private teacher who has been really good. If you do group classes people learn at different speeds and have different motivations for learning the language.

    The learningindonesian website is also a great resource.
     
  4. tintin

    tintin Active Member

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    Gilbert, Sir

    When, many years ago, I had finally decided to really learn proper bahasa Indonesia, I found a teacher in Ubud (he was a school principal in a Kedewatan school) and I went to his house for one hour every day, except sundays, until we had finished the two books of Beginning Indonesian Through Self-Instruction, by John Wolff, Dede Oetomo, and Daniel Fietkiewicz, from Cornell University (it took MANY months!). Cornell is the #1 university in the USA for Indonesian studies, and this method has the reputation to be one of the best, if not the best available. Personally, I found it very logical and complete in its organization and content.

    There are more books in the series, such has Formal Indonesian, or Indonesian Conversations, or Indonesian Readings, but these were above my guru's competence, and I quit (also, I forgot how much Ihe charged, but it was cheap).

    But I had been told, and he confirmed it, that if I first mastered bahasa Indonesia, I would have no problem with bahasa Bali, and I could become fairly proficient in the latter in no time. I don't know if this would have been true, because I never got to bahasa Bali. :roll:

    PS. The Wolff's books has since been put on CDs.
     
  5. gilbert de jong

    gilbert de jong Active Member

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    hi tintin,
    jangan pangil saya tuan, hihihi, saya belum cukup tua jadi tuan. :wink:
    Thanks all for the info provided. It's not the Bahasa Indonesia i'm struggling with, that's going already pretty well, considering I learned most from watching subtitled movies, a dictionary and listening while asking questions when friends of mine talk Indonesian.
    But when they switch to the Bahasa Bali, I'm lost....
    It sounds very different from Indonesian, and is probably also written very different. Too bad tin, you didn't get too learning the Balinese language, but who knows, maybe in the future you still might want to learn it.

    Spicyayam...I think you're talking about Indonesian as well, and not Balinese?

    Markit....you're funny and I like your humor. All the girls I have somewhat dated with here, are more interested in other things then teaching me Balinese. And to be honest, me too, hahaha.

    Thanks again y'all who have posted so far....
    friendly greetings, Gilbert.
     
  6. hinakos

    hinakos Member

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    must be getting different movies to me....


    most of the ones i get make no sense whatsoever whether its english to english, or english to Indo but make a good laugh for a while
     
  7. gilbert de jong

    gilbert de jong Active Member

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    Hi Hinakos,

    That's why I used the dictonary too, to check (translate) the indonesian subtitles to dutch and then the dutch to English what actualy was said in the movie. a bit complicated I know, :lol: , but it worked for me.
    I also had a rosetta stone language disc...but that didn't make sense to me, never gave it a second look or try, so I threw that in the bin.
    friendly greetings........Gilbert.
     
  8. mimpimanis

    mimpimanis Active Member

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    One line I always remember was in the English film "Maybe Baby" when the female lead says she will go and check if she is ovulating and the translation was she was going to feed the dog! :lol:

    Sin City was one of the funniest ever subtitles - I dont remember the film at all because the subtitles (english) had us in stitches!
     
  9. spicyayam

    spicyayam Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, didn't read you post properly :oops:

    I sometimes have the English subtitles on and I can't believe how bad they are.

    I agree watching movies with Indonesian subtitles is a good way to pick up the language, but I wonder if they are as bad as the English ones.
     
  10. gilbert de jong

    gilbert de jong Active Member

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    Hi spicyayam,
    No worries about the mis-read :) , can happen to anyone and no need to be sorry!

    I wouldn't know about the English subtitles, but given the fact that English seems to be hard to learn for Indonesians I have no doubt they are very bad. Sometimes the Indonesian subtitles don't make sense at all, for the same reason, hahaha. I mean how can someone do english subtitles if they themself are not fluent in the Language?
    But with the dictionary and some common sense, it worked ok for me, combining ofcourse the will to really learn :wink: .
    Friendly greetings......Gilbert.

    Ps: still haven't found someone or something that would enable me to learn Bahasa Bali :roll:
     
  11. spicyayam

    spicyayam Well-Known Member

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    The English subtitles are extremely bad in many cases and if you relied on them you would have no sense of the movie. All these pirated movies are the same in Asia. I don't know for certain but i suspect they originally come out of China.

    Wish I could help you with the Balinese, but I suspect it is just a matter of finding a local and sitting down with them and trying to learn. I know I learned some local dialects when I was in China and it was amazing how once you learnt a few basic phrases, you would then hear them constantly out on the street, in markets etc.
     
  12. calitobali

    calitobali Member

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    I've found Bahasa Bali to be very difficult, while I think Bahasa Indonesia is extremely easy. I've only been here for 8 months (8 months exactly today) and it is my first time here in Bali, but my Bahasa Indonesia is already proficient enough to handle any day to day situation that arises. I wouldn't call myself fluent yet, but almost.

    Bahasa Bali on the other hand, with it's caste system gets really hard, because I will learn a word, and then use it, only to be told that the word is impolite to use with the person I just said it to, or way too formal for the situation. For example, if I were to speak with an older man I would have to speak to him in High Balinese, while he would respond to me, a young man, in Low Balinese. Low Balinese amongst friends, Middle Balinese out and about. It's just like Bahasa Sunda in that way.

    I see it as almost like having to learn 3 languages (more like 2 and a half actually, as Middle Balinese is a mixture of low and high), just to learn one. I've yet to meet an expat who can speak Bahasa Bali (I'm sure they exist in the more rural areas of Bali compared to south Bali), and even most expats that I meet don't have very good Indonesian either.

    I asked a friend if he knows anything about Bahasa Bali lessons, as I enjoy learning new languages, and he says he had never heard of any, but would be more than willing to teach me for free. Actually 2 friends have said the exact same thing. Gotta love the Balinese.
     
  13. juju

    juju New Member

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    I believe the best method is to just hack it out with your Balinese friends, This is how I learn. However I think you will find that a lot of what you are learning is Kasar. I see you mentioned you wanted to learn Alus. I personally concentrate on Kasar as this is what my friends speak between each other, However, I am mindfull when talking to my friends parents that I incorporate as much Alus that I know. Its for this reason that I only now a few of the basics in Alus.

    For those that believe that Balinese is a natural and easy progression from Indonesian, i would beg to differ... however, The way I am slowly (really slowly) learning a little Balinese is by mixing my Indonesian and Balinese together. If say, for example I am talking with a Balinese friend and I know the expression or word in Balinese I just use it, My friends are used to it and help me along, although sometimes it becomes a point of amusement. Now I find that people that know that I can speak just a little Balinese always use it with me all the time, this forces me to learn, for example, I might be at my local DVD store and the girls inside talk to me in Balinese, although I can only understand a few words here and there, it motivates me to have learnt just a little more the next time I come in.....

    All in all, Every Balinese person I have met that see's my willingness to learn their language is always delighted...

    Btw- A girl (A long haired dictionary) is always a tried and true method... However, during my first year learning Indonesian I mainly learnt listening to my girlfriend gossiping with her friends in the Kos, later this would sometimes prove embarrassing whilst hanging with my Balinese mates, as I sometimes reverted to the use of an expression or word that is considered effeminate.
     
  14. unzum

    unzum New Member

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    Apologies for the thread resurrection but I thought some of you might find these links useful for learning Balinese.
    Balinese lessons is an 18 lesson online course with limited audio and is in the process of being translated from the original Japanese.

    As for books, there's Practical Balinese, which seems to be a phrasebook plus grammar explanations, and Everyday Balinese, which is a textbook with 23 lessons.
     
  15. Surya Dharma

    Surya Dharma New Member

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    It's hard to find a good Bahasa Bali teacher because so few foreigners can even speak Indonesian. Like you, they have to be very good at Indonesian first.
     
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