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Home schooling in Bali?

Discussion in 'Marriage, Kids and Schools' started by Barbie, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Is there anybody home schooling in Bali? I will be in Bali for quite a while with my kids. Not planning to send them to school there. Is there any expat homeschooling groups or activities, communauty centers? Will it be easy for my daughters to socialize?

    wondering...

    Barbie
     
  2. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    Where in Bali are you planning to live? I'm a primary schoolteacher and looking for a job like that.....but I'm around Ubud
     
  3. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Re: RE: Home schooling in Bali?

    I am not sure where we'll be staying. I want to build a house. Still looking. You like it around Ubud? Have you been there for quite a while?

    Babie
     
  4. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Re: RE: Home schooling in Bali?

     
  5. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    Actually I meant that I will be living around Ubud, starting July, sorry! But I hope I will like it :)
     
  6. lise

    lise Member

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    I'll be homeschooling in Bali beginning in July...my daughter is nearly 8. We should continue this conversation...I'd be pleased to hook up with other families and perhaps share a part-time teacher.

    b.t.w., Does anyone know if John Hardy still has the Steiner teacher from Australia teaching/homeschooling his children?
     
  7. Roy

    Roy Active Member

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    Lise, John’s kids are in the US. They are only in Bali during the Summer months.

    Barbie and Margriet…contact me when you get settled in. A number of us expats in Ubud with kids are considering this option. The daily compute to Denpasar or Sanur is grueling.

    BUT…with that being said, most of us also feel that 100% home schooling is not good either. We all feel there is a great need for our kids to socialize with other kids, and develop those skills as well. The majority of opinion on home schooling here is as an augmentation to regular schooling.
     
  8. lise

    lise Member

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    Exactly, Roy. That's why I'm hoping to connect with other families and perhaps share a part-time teacher. I've been in California doing some work and it's becoming the trend here...the children meet a few times a week for a few classes together and socialization. Also, different parents who have specialized skills 'host' the children for classes.

    What's the current school situation in Ubud? Did anything new ever materialize? There were a few things in the works when I left but projects seem to fizzle out rapidly there.
     
  9. Roy

    Roy Active Member

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    I am embarrassed to admit this, but I’ve forgotten the name of the founder of the International School in Sanur who was seriously thinking about doing the same thing in Ubud. He died some three or so years ago, so that dream went with him.

    In the years since, the number of expats with kids in the Ubud area has grown substantially. Within this community however, there are great financial voids. Some are very well off, others are not. All however share a great friendship and a very serious commitment to the education of their kids.

    Except for pre-school and kindergarten, most all the expats I know do not use Ubud based schools. The only decent school here, for that early level is Suta Dharma.

    The concept of part time home schooling would go over very well here. We’ve all talked about it, and we all agree of the importance such a venue would be for our kids.

    Tons of details need to be discussed, worked out and formulated into general agreement, but for sure, you can count me in, and you can also count on many more.
     
  10. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    I was trying to hire a classroom in a school to be able to teach, but since I will come on a social budaya visum that's not possible. I already found a space to teach small amounts of children for just 1 or 2 times a week. The only problem then is the books and materials that I need. Or do the children have those?
     
  11. Roy

    Roy Active Member

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    OK, let me throw out some observations on how the parental Ubud area expats are thinking. And this is just stream of memory, with no particular order of importance, etc.

    For one, home schooling means just that…home schooling. We don’t want to ship off our kids to yet another school room every day after their formal session is over. Most of us envision the “home” as rotational, like a car pool…one week at so and so’s house, the other week at another house, etc.

    Recognizing the disparity at grade levels, and ages of our kids, we are not thinking along the lines of formal curriculums. Rather, we envision a mix of ages and levels being guided by the “home teacher” with their own books and materials. For lack of a better word, let’s call it “exercise” or professionally supervised home work. But’s it’s NOT baby sitting…so please don’t think that’s our idea.

    Depending on the formal schools our kids are attending, some will have morning classes, and others afternoon classes. Accommodating that reality, “our” home teachers would have a pretty full daily schedule, at two different homes every day…and for about two, maybe three hours, but not more. That means two or three hours a day in the morning, home schooling the afternoon session kids, and two or three hours an afternoon for the morning session kids.

    We envision this as an augment to our kid’s regular daily “formal school” education. Recognizing that kids can only absorb so much in a day…more formal classroom stuff is not what we want. The number of kids at every “home schooling” session will not be large, but the age and current level will be significant.

    Another advantage that we recognize is that our professional home teachers will eventually be able to size up each our kid’s level of academic performance, and be a valuable guide to us parents regarding future decisions we need to make about their education.

    In summary, our vision is something in between formal tutorial, which even those of us that can afford it, don’t want, and an expat social/cultural continuation of education. By that, I am referring to a need that we all have that our kids also socialize and participate with other expat kids within our community.

    For the kids on a morning “home school” experience, it’s a jump start for their full afternoon of formalized school. For kids on an afternoon “home school” session, it’s a debriefing, a review of sorts of what went on in their formalized school morning session.

    Anyway, these are some of the ideas we are kicking around here in Ubud. Your thoughts, observations, and suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

    In summary, we all know we have to “bite the bullet” sooner or later. Short of us all coming together and funding a first rate international school here in Ubud, which would be a monumentally expensive venture, this “home schooling” idea is very attractive…so long as it is done on our terms.
     
  12. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Hi,

    I'm so happy to see so many replies! I have a 3 and a 7 years old and I've always home schooled for many reasons. I do agree that socialization is essential for the kids development. About books, it would sure help to have a few but there are so many ways to learn than to go "by the book" and so many other things we could do...

    We could regroup the kids just to have them play together, organize some craft activities, gardening or sports?!?!

    Looking forward to meeting you all!

    Barbie
     
  13. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    Sounds really interesting Roy...and makes sense also.
    But if I'm thinking about myself as the teacher I'm wondering what you really want me to do with those children. Of course I can come up with handicraft activities, gardening and singing songs, something like Barbie suggests...but is that what you are looking for? Because you say that what you want is not babysitting. The activities that I describe are also used by daycare (which in Holland is almost the same as babysitting). Or do you see it more as a time to do homework together, with a teacher to guide this and giving children extra help for their problems in their development? And aside from doing homework also doing some nice activities together as the handicraft and singing? And because you say you don't want to follow a normal school curriculum (which I can understand since the children already follow a normal curriculum) I'm wondering if there are there any goals for this home schooling that the children have to reach?
    I'm really looking forward to hear your opinion about these matters.

    Margriet
     
  14. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    Oh, and another question. I'm used to working with children from 4 up till 6 years old (although I'm qualified to teach up till 12 years old). Are the children in this age already having homework? In Holland they don't. So I guess home schooling for these children will contain many group activities like games, handicraft etc....
     
  15. lise

    lise Member

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    My thought is to do something along the lines of what's become popular in California. The children have "homeschool" at home, i.e. time set out for learning in a traditional or non-traditional way (that's up to each individual parent as to how they choose to present information.) In addition, they attend weekly scheduled classes with a teacher (for instance, with you, Margriet) for 2-3 hours a few days a week (say, MWF from 9-12 or whatever.) These scheduled times with a teacher provide not only socialization through organized activities (it could be art, language classes, math, music, crafts, sport) ...whatever the parent group decides will best serve the needs of that particular group of students. The parents chip in for materials and to pay a part-time teacher. This also normally requires no formal 'classroom' space as there is usually a parent or two in the group who can offer a large room or veranda in their house for the children to congregate. This past summer we took 6 parents, hired a teacher, and created our own summer program that was run out of my home because I had lots of open, versitile space. It worked great. With the varied age ranges of the Ubud children, one solution would be that the scheduled times with the teacher be broken down into two age groups i.e. age 5-8 from 9-11a.m. and age 9-12 from 11-1 p.m. each day.

    A third support option is that parents with specialized skills 'host' the children once a week for an hour for a class. (example...I teach french)

    For groups of parents with similar-aged children, who are committed and involved (and not flaky) they often bypass the part-time teacher option and host the group lessons themselves.
    I do like the idea of having a part-time teacher, myself. I think the structured environment and non-parental authority figure offers growth and socialization opportunities for the children that they don't necessarily get when they remain exclusively in the home-based environments.

    For the families who have different educational philosophies, this set-up also serves everyone well because the group class/activity time can be structured to appeal to the group and individual preferences can be expressed in the home 'school' time.

    Comments?
     
  16. Roy

    Roy Active Member

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    Yup, that sums it up nicely. Now, my turn for a question. How much per hour are you and the other home teachers thinking you will be able to make here in Bali?

    You can base your answers on an assumption of five days a week, 4 hours total per day, or say a total of 80 hours a month.

    You should be aware that most teachers here in Bali earn only around 1 million Rp a month...for full time teaching. Many teachers earn a lot less. Many of those teachers make themselves available for home schooling or tudoring to supplement their incomes. So that's what you're up against as far as competition. :shock:
     
  17. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    well, I compare it to what I can make teaching children Dutch in Indonesia; that would be 200 euro a month for 3 times 3 hours per week (so the total is 36 hours per month) I would be happy with about 180 - 200 euro a month. It depends a little bit on how many children I have to teach and if it's 1 or 2 groups per day. But then I'm still cheap I quess as a fully qualified expat teacher.
     
  18. Roy

    Roy Active Member

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    Do you mean like teaching Dutch in a Dutch school in Jakarta? I'm unclear what you mean.
     
  19. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    no, teaching Dutch in the afternoon, just like the home schooling, but with Dutch expatriat kids. During the day they go to school, during 3 afternoons per week they come to a classroom to learn Dutch.
     
  20. Margriet

    Margriet Member

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    Roy, you never responded to the amount of money that I would like to make as a private teacher. I'm interested in your opinion, if it's resonable or not...
     
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