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Home schooling in Bali?

Discussion in 'Marriage, Kids and Schools' started by tiahaylie, May 9, 2011.

  1. tiahaylie

    tiahaylie New Member

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    Hi all,

    I was just wondering if any of you home school your children in Bali?
    If we make the move we have realised that international schooling is quite exspensive in Bali, and thought home schooling may be an alternative option as we have 3 children to school.

    Also do any of you know of any schools that are not over the top with their fees?

    Thanks :icon_e_smile:
     
    #1 tiahaylie, May 9, 2011
    Last edited: May 9, 2011
  2. JohnnyCool

    JohnnyCool Active Member

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    You didn't mention the ages of your children, which country's educational curriculum they'll be following and for how long.

    Home schooling might be an option. However, it's not necessarily all that easy (again, depending on your childrens' ages). Someone will have to monitor lessons and make sure the required "homework" is done. Chances are you'll also need a reasonable internet connection (say about Rp 700,000/month).

    Sometimes it can be "simpler" to enroll your children in local schools (dependent upon your visas). Then you have the language problem. But, if you're seriously considering moving everybody to live in Bali, that'd be just another challenge for all involved.

    It's all possible...
    Best wishes whatever you decide to do.
     
  3. tiahaylie

    tiahaylie New Member

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    Hi,

    our children are young 5,4 and 2yrs. We would be following the Australian curriculum. At the moment im just getting some ideas about the schooling in Bali and seeing if anyone has any advice :icon_e_smile: Thanks for your info.

    Thanks:icon_e_smile:
     
  4. JohnnyCool

    JohnnyCool Active Member

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    At their ages, I think following the "Australian curriculum" isn't all that important. If you're planning to live here for a long time, your children will benefit primarily from learning "social skills". Academic stuff can wait a while (or be supplemented by you, the parents - and maybe a "tutor").

    My half-Balinese son went to a Montessori school in Ubud when he was age five. He's a bright boy and quite frankly, there was little "taught" to him there. However, he did meet and socialise with many other expat children as well as Balinese ones (including some who were in wheel-chairs). IMHO, those interactions were invaluable...

    Everybody is different and what works for some may not work for others. "Normal" Balinese schools can be a mixed bag. Some are fine and some train their students to be human parrots. Nevertheless, they are an option worth considering (with the appropriate visas).

    Your eldest child has at least two years, or so, to "catch up" with the Australian curriculum (if necessary). Life in Bali for those years may be worth far much more than what he/she would get in the Australian education system.
     
  5. Fred2

    Fred2 Member

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    johnnycool can I ask what visa you need to go to a local school?
     
  6. tiahaylie

    tiahaylie New Member

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    Thanks for that fantastic info JohnnyCool,

    I totally agree with your way of thinking. One of the big reasons for coming to Bali is for the kids to experience the Bali way of life. You can not get that back home in Australia. My niece who is also half balinese was far more advaned then her cousin here in Aust. She is now in perth doing her final years at school and is way ahead of them all. She was educated in Bali in both local and international school.

    I also have no problem with tutors or us helping them, after all we will have time in Bali not like here in Aust.
    What visa do you need for the schooling?
     
  7. JohnnyCool

    JohnnyCool Active Member

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    Hi Fred2

    Unless things have changed, at least a SosBud (Social Visa).
    That's what I had at the time my son went to school here.

    Go to a school and ask. Different schools, different answers.
     
  8. Fred2

    Fred2 Member

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    Johnnycool
    Your son is Indonesian?
     
  9. JohnnyCool

    JohnnyCool Active Member

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    No - he's technically Australian (was born there). He's still got a couple of years to decide for himself if he'd like to be "Indonesian" (or both).
     
  10. Fred2

    Fred2 Member

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    Your son is classed as Indonesian so can go to any local school for free, some schools will charge for bits & pieces. None Indonesian will need a Kitas & can only go to government plus school or private International schools, both cost big money. Here in Surabaya there is a International school on every corner:icon_mrgreen:.
     
  11. JohnnyCool

    JohnnyCool Active Member

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    Well, my son was born in Australia. His mother is Balinese.

    When I said above that a SosBud visa was the minimum visa "requirement", I should have elaborated a bit more. Sorry for that oversight.

    We started him off in a local school and because his mother is Balinese, there was no problem (at the time - this was about 11 years ago). The private school required him to have some version of a Kiddies' KITAS, which we got. We had to go to Singapore around that time anyway (probably to renew my SosBud and update his childhood vaccinations- I forget all the details).

    I do remember that it was relatively inexpensive - didn't have to pay the US$ 1200 manpower tax, for example. I also remember being slightly peeved that my young son had a KITAS and I didn't.

    The situation for 100% foreign children with expat parents is, as you point out, different (and usually expensive). I hope this clears up any misunderstandings.
     
  12. Carolinaandretti

    Carolinaandretti New Member

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    homeschool

    I can do homeschooling if you're interested. Because, I am a teacher and I taught for some children as well.
     
  13. Tamispecial

    Tamispecial Member

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    Hi Carolina.....could you please send me a PM regarding your homeschooling as I am making enquiries on behalf of a friend of mine who will be moving here with his family in a few months......his wife is Indonesian.

    Thankyou very much.
     
  14. okta

    okta Member

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    A little question about homeschooling,
    What is the perfect size limit for homeschooling? I have friends who also considering home schooling but dont know if 5 children with ages differences (2,5 yo to 7 yo) would be suitable.. Thanks
     
    #14 okta, Jul 22, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  15. Carolinaandretti

    Carolinaandretti New Member

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    Hi,

    Actually, I have my team in tutoring kids and all of them are teachers. So, if there are 5 children with differences ages, I will split them in different classes. Because, they have different lessons too. I think, it would be better, if we meet and discuss for more details. Thanks.
     
  16. okta

    okta Member

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    Thanks Carolina, but we decided to send our daughter to Montessori school. Good luck with the home schooling program
     
  17. bantch

    bantch New Member

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    I am very sceptical of home schooling, so for my money I am pleased with this decision! Well done. Parents are great for suplimentary education
     
  18. The Larkins

    The Larkins New Member

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    Samisan

    Continuing on our conversation about curriculum, you said:

    "Interesting about the curriculum, I had planned to pick and choose, but yes I have been concerned about following it.

    How do you 'grade' a child if they have not followed a general school curriculum and its tests if you ever wish to put the kids back into a school.....don't they then rely on what level the child is based on what they have done and tests they have passed ?"

    In my experience, kids who return to a schooling system are put in with children their own age. They (the homeschooled children) are usually ahead of their peers. In my own experience, my children were well ahead when they returned to mainstream education. One so far ahead that she was bored to tears. We got around that by sending her to school 4 days a week and having her tutored in the subjects she excelled in (Maths, English, Science and Spanish) elsewhere on the other day. It worked fine.

    My other daughter was ahead in certain areas and on a par in others.

    I think the most important thing, for me, was to get away from the notion that we were trying to ape school. Schools are a relatively new invention - they sprang up around factories during the industrial revolution to ready a workforce for the factories, or the agricultural living nearby. in part, that's why we have a tradition of long summer holidays here in Ireland - the children were needed to help out on the farms saving hay etc. in the summer months.

    I found that my girls were interested in a deeper and broader understanding of subject matter than they would have received in school. There are loads of online resources for home-schooling or un-schooling, depending on what you're looking for. How old are your children?

    H
     
  19. Markit

    Markit Active Member

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    Boy I really want her to teach my kids here in Bali cause they all want to grow up to be fecking window washers!! Pass the squeegee.
     
  20. The Larkins

    The Larkins New Member

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    Honestly, when I read this, it struck me that it's not really home-schooling in the sense that I know it. It sounds more like trying to replicate a classroom in the home. It would also be unusual to split the children up according to their ages. From what I know of home-schooling families, they run with a topic and expect that each child covering that topic does it to the best of his/her ability.

    Also - and this is completely off-topic - I love your use of the word 'fecking'. Usually, only Irish people use that word. :)
     
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